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Various Used Electric Guitars

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Used Eastwood  Airline H78
Used Eastwood  Airline H78 Used Eastwood  Airline H78 Used Eastwood  Airline H78 Used Eastwood  Airline H78

Used Eastwood Airline H78

Year of Manufacture -2014

Serial Number -1400882

Case - gig bag

Condition - v good

Weight - 7llbs 9oz

This tribute to the 1960's Airline H77/78 - which at the time was also available under the brands of Harmony and Silvertone - covers all the best parts of the originals, but kicks it up a notch for 2014. True in almost every detail to the original, "upgraded" features include the new Gold Foil Argyle pickups, a modern roller bridge for tuning stability, a center block for Bigsby stability and feedback suppression.


An instrument of this quality is always more of an

investment than a spur-of-the-moment purchase, with

a price to reflect such a commitment. However,

here at Oasis we offer a range of finance options (including 0% interest),

allowing you to spread the cost over several months with a payment plan that will suit you.


Please email or call us on 01425 478135 for details


Price:550.00
(Including VAT at 20%)


Quantity:  

Used  Eastman t64v in vintage  amber with  hardcase
Used  Eastman t64v in vintage  amber with  hardcaseUsed  Eastman t64v in vintage  amber with  hardcaseUsed  Eastman t64v in vintage  amber with  hardcaseUsed  Eastman t64v in vintage  amber with  hardcase

Used Eastman t64v in vintage amber with hardcase

Year of Manufacture -2017

Serial Number -l67500

Case - hardcase

Condition - as new

Weight - 5llbs4oz

Hand crafted by a small team of luthiers, Eastman Guitars deliver incredible quality at a much lower price point than their comparable rival brands.

Drawing inspiration from the classic hollowbody design of the '50s, the Eastman T64/V features a laminate Maple top, back and sides for a lightweight but sonically rich tone. With the famed Eastman Antique Varnish finish the wood is able to breathe freely, delivering a naturally resonant and organic sound. This labour intensive process produces a finish even thinner than lacquer for the best tonal response.

The Maple neck has a sweet Ebony fingerboard that benefits from 22 Jescar frets, a 24.75" scale length and 12" radius. With parallelogram inlays it has a real vintage vibe. It feels smooth, comfortable and familiar.

Pickups come courtesy of Seymour Duncan with a pair of Seymour Dog Ear P-90s for that real vintage vibe. With a rich tonal range, the Eastman T64/V is perfect for a wide variety of styles. The Bigsby B7 tremolo offers great tuning stability and the chance to add some lush texture to your sound.

With a hardshell case included the Eastman range represents incredible value for money


An instrument of this quality is always more of an

investment than a spur-of-the-moment purchase, with

a price to reflect such a commitment. However,

here at Oasis we offer a range of finance options (including 0% interest),

allowing you to spread the cost over several months with a payment plan that will suit you.


Please email or call us on 01425 478135 for details



Price:1,500.00
(Including VAT at 20%)




Click link above to view payment plan details.
Other payment options available on request please phone or email.

Quantity:  

Used Guild 1955 Aristocrat with Changed Pick Up Great Neck, lifton case 4llbs15oz
Used Guild 1955 Aristocrat with Changed Pick Up Great Neck, lifton case 4llbs15ozUsed Guild 1955 Aristocrat with Changed Pick Up Great Neck, lifton case 4llbs15ozUsed Guild 1955 Aristocrat with Changed Pick Up Great Neck, lifton case 4llbs15ozUsed Guild 1955 Aristocrat with Changed Pick Up Great Neck, lifton case 4llbs15oz

Used Guild 1955 Aristocrat with Changed Pick Up Great Neck, lifton case 4llbs15oz


Year of Manufacture -1955

Serial Number -4355

Case - lifton case

Condition - Very Nice indeed

Weight - An Amazing 4llbs15oz

A rare and unique model, possibly Guild's most interesting electric, made to resemble a Les Paul with the important difference that it is hollow. This one is extremely rare in that it has a single pick-up, while retaining most of the cosmetic details of the two pickup M-75. The the pick up has been changed to a humbucker . Guild's catalog called the Aristocrat ?a magnificence of tone never before achieved in a guitar of this size..


An instrument of this quality is always more of an

investment than a spur-of-the-moment purchase, with

a price to reflect such a commitment. However,

here at Oasis we offer a range of finance options (including 0% interest),

allowing you to spread the cost over several months with a payment plan that will suit you.


Please email or call us on 01425 478135 for details




Price:2,500.00
(Including VAT at 20%)




Click link above to view payment plan details.
Other payment options available on request please phone or email.

Quantity:  

Used Guild CE100D Capri USA Jazz Box 1977 with hard case
Used Guild CE100D Capri USA Jazz Box 1977 with hard caseUsed Guild CE100D Capri USA Jazz Box 1977 with hard caseUsed Guild CE100D Capri USA Jazz Box 1977 with hard caseUsed Guild CE100D Capri USA Jazz Box 1977 with hard case

Used Guild CE100D Capri USA Jazz Box 1977 with hard case

Year of Manufacture -1977

Serial Number -157724

Case - Hard case

Condition - Very Clean

Weight - 8llbs7oz

Sunburst finish, all original and in near excellent condition for its age. The Guild Capri CE-100 D was Guilds answer to Gibsons ES-175. Hollowbody archtop guitar with florentine cutaway and no sustain-block and two humbucker pickups. The guitar is in very good shape, only little playwear , no hidden repairs. The tuners are original to the guitar, have never been changed and work fine, the frets are in great condition too, lightweight and comfortable to play, very versatile where tone quality is concerned.

An instrument of this quality is always more of an

investment than a spur-of-the-moment purchase, with

a price to reflect such a commitment. However,

here at Oasis we offer a range of finance options (including 0% interest),

allowing you to spread the cost over several months with a payment plan that will suit you.


Please email or call us on 01425 478135 for details



Price:1,295.00
(Including VAT at 20%)




Click link above to view payment plan details.
Other payment options available on request please phone or email.

Quantity:  

Used Mid 70s Greco Spacey Sound with rewound pickups by the Creamery.
Used Mid 70s Greco Spacey Sound with rewound pickups by the Creamery.Used Mid 70s Greco Spacey Sound with rewound pickups by the Creamery.Used Mid 70s Greco Spacey Sound with rewound pickups by the Creamery.Used Mid 70s Greco Spacey Sound with rewound pickups by the Creamery.

Used Mid 70s Greco Spacey Sound with rewound pickups by the Creamery.

Year of Manufacture - mid 70s

Serial Number -on aplication

Case - Gig bag

Condition - Very Very Clean

Weight - 8llbs

It's no secret that during the seventies some of the good Japanese factories were capable of building better Fenders than Fender, and this is an example of how good they became. Greco's Fenders were so good that they were eventually amalgamated by Fender Japan with the builders who made these guitars going on to build Japanese Fenders. This Greco has had its pick ups rewound by the creamery to match the tonal characteristics of fenders 70s wide Range Humbuckers and has recently been refretted.
In great condition and ready to gig.


An instrument of this quality is always more of an

investment than a spur-of-the-moment purchase, with

a price to reflect such a commitment. However,

here at Oasis we offer a range of finance options (including 0% interest),

allowing you to spread the cost over several months with a payment plan that will suit you.


Please email or call us on 01425 478135 for details


Price:700.00
(Including VAT at 20%)


Quantity:  

Used PRS SE Zac Myers. mint condition trampas Green
Used PRS SE Zac Myers. mint condition trampas GreenUsed PRS SE Zac Myers. mint condition trampas GreenUsed PRS SE Zac Myers. mint condition trampas GreenUsed PRS SE Zac Myers. mint condition trampas Green

Used PRS SE Zac Myers. mint condition trampas Green

Year of Manufacture 2017

Serial Number -R19130

Case - Soft case

Condition - immaculate

Weight - 5llbs11oz

The SE Zach Myers has enough features to satisfy even the most demanding musicians. The resonance of the semi-hollow body paired with the smooth feel of the satin finish neck will make an immediate impression in your hands.

"I’ve been with PRS for 12 years. This is the best guitar I have ever played," – Zach Myers, Shinedown

Zach Myers, lead guitarist of the multi-platinum rock band Shinedown, picked up a PRS Custom 22 at the age of fifteen and announced his first SE signature model in 2010. As a guitarist who has rocked PRS on the stage and teched for several PRS bands, Myers has an intimate understanding of how a guitar should feel and what the build quality should be.

The 2017 SE Zach Myers features a chambered mahogany body with maple cap, flame maple veneer and single f-hole that provides smooth mid-range tones with a natural, resonant internal reverb. The 22-fret 24.5” scale length wide fat neck boasts a satin finish that gives the guitar a very comfortable, woody, worn-in feel. Additional appointments to the SE Zach Myers signature model include PRS adjustable stoptail bridge, vintage style tuners, and PRS SE 245 pickups paired with two volume and two tone controls and a 3-way toggle pickup switch.

Please email or call us on 01425 478135 for details


Price:600.00
(Including VAT at 20%)




Click link above to view payment plan details.
Other payment options available on request please phone or email.

Quantity:  

Used Casio MG510 Midi Guitar in Black circa 1987-1989. As used by JJ Cale.
Used Casio MG510 Midi Guitar in Black circa 1987-1989. As used by JJ Cale.Used Casio MG510 Midi Guitar in Black circa 1987-1989. As used by JJ Cale.Used Casio MG510 Midi Guitar in Black circa 1987-1989. As used by JJ Cale.Used Casio MG510 Midi Guitar in Black circa 1987-1989. As used by JJ Cale.

Used Casio MG510 Midi Guitar in Black circa 1987-1989. As used by JJ Cale.

Year of Manufacture - 1987-89

Serial Number - t006450

Case - Gig Bag

Condition - Very good working order

Weight - 8llbs9oz

Please email or call us on 01425 478135 for details

Nice rare guitar.Very hard to find the Casio MIDI guitar today in 100% working condition. Straight neck, low strings action, Midi function works perfectly. Electronics works perfectly. I tested this guitar with several Korg and Roland rack modules using MIDI, All strings responded. Simply amazing. Comes in the nice gig bag.

OF ALL THE challenges faced by manufacturers of hi-tech instruments, the MIDI guitar is perhaps the toughest. The problem is not only the technological one of how best to translate a guitarist's performance into MIDI data, but a practical one of how to present MIDI to guitarists in an acceptable manner.

For their entry into the MIDI guitar market, Casio have put all the MIDI electronics into a standard solid-body electric guitar and presented MIDI in as straightforward a way as possible. The standard guitar controls are set into the scratchplate, while an adjacent panel contains the MIDI controls: a MIDI volume control knob and three 3-position toggle switches. This has the effect of making the MIDI side of the guitar as simple (and quick) to operate as the regular guitar controls, which can only inspire confidence in any budding MIDI guitarist.

Guitar

THERE ARE TWO models to choose from: the MG500 and the MG510. These are available in three colours (red, white and black) and come with a tremolo arm fitted as standard. In fact the two models are identical in every way except for the shape of the body. The 510 adopts the familiar "Strat" shape, while the 500's shape can only be described as "futuristic".

Both MGs have a basswood body and maple neck, and the 22-fret fretboard is rosewood. The guitars sport three pickups: two EMG-styled single-coils and a humbucker (double coil). A five-position switch allows you to select each of the three pickups or combinations of single-coil and humbucker. Additionally, a coil tap allows you to switch out one of the humbucker coils. These choices give the guitar quite a wide tonal range. The complement of guitar controls is rounded off by volume and tone knobs.

The necks are slim, smoothly-contoured and comfortable to play on. Casio have used a flat fretboard which is slightly wider than the average electric guitar fretboard - more akin to a classical guitar, in fact, and perhaps best suited to a clean playing style. The action is fast and smooth and, at the same time, manages to avoid fret buzz (unless you employ a particularly hard picking style).

The MG series has an adjustable bolt-on neck, so in true guitarist fashion you can replace it with a neck that better suits your playing style if need be. You can also adjust the neck curvature by turning the adjusting nut on the headstock of the guitar (a large custom wrench is provided for this purpose), and also make adjustments to the machine head torque (helping to prevent detuning), guitar pickup height (for a thinner or a thicker sound), and the bridge height (for fine-tuning the string action). Another, smaller wrench is provided for the latter operation.

Perhaps surprisingly, given the fact that the MIDI electronics are on board the instrument, the MGs don't weigh appreciably more than your average solid-body guitar. What's more, both instruments are well-balanced when strapped on, with comfortably contoured bodies.

The tremolo arm is not one of the strong points of the design, however; in fact, it's rather flimsy, though it does perform its allotted task well. Disappointingly, it's not a locking trem, nor is there a locking nut - neither of which bodes well for strings remaining in tune. A further irritation is that the arm hangs over the MIDI panel when not in use.


"Casio's pitch-to-MIDI approach inevitably means that there is a delay between picking a note and hearing the equivalent pitch on a MIDI sound module."

MIDI

AS YOU'VE NO doubt realised, Casio have adopted the pitch-to-MIDI approach of deriving MIDI data from their guitars; the requisite MIDI conversion pickup is built into the guitar, located immediately next to the bridge. To adjust the MIDI sensitivity for each string you have to peel off a rubber strip on the rear of the body, where you'll find a small screw for each string. It sounds a bit messy but it's not too much of a pain, as you're unlikely to want to adjust them very often.

The pitch-to-MIDI approach inevitably means there is a delay between picking a note and hearing the equivalent pitch on a MIDI sound module, as the conversion circuitry has to be able to pick up a dearly-defined frequency. On the MGs this seems to be in the region of 25-30 milliseconds, which is pretty much par for the course; though it is a little frustrating when you want a sharp, on-the-ball attack from your MIDI sounds.

And so to the MIDI control panel. As mentioned earlier, this consists of a MIDI volume knob and three toggle switches. Separate volume knobs for the guitar and the MIDI modules gives you plenty of flexibility when it comes to balancing the two, but in addition one of the toggle switches allows you to quickly select guitar, MIDI, or guitar plus MIDI, output.

The middle switch is a three-position octave selector which alters the MIDI pitch output from the guitar, allowing you to quickly switch the range of your MIDI instruments and to reach bass notes which would otherwise be below the guitar's range. One useful application of this could be to play basslines on the upper strings, where there will be less of a delay.

The third toggle switch allows you to select between normal and chromatic playing modes. Normal allows pitch-bends and string glissandos of a semitone or more, while chromatic mode allows pitch-bend within a semitone but retriggers notes whenever their bent or "glissed" pitch reaches an adjacent semitone. In English, this means that if your left-hand playing style involves a lot of hammer-ons and pull-offs, you'll need chromatic mode, as normal mode has problems tracking non-picked notes (which it presumably tries to handle as pitch-bend).

Casio have been rather ingenious when it comes to transmitting patch changes. You flick the normal/chromatic switch to a third position, play a note on the guitar, and then flick the switch back again. Hey presto, you have a new sound on your MIDI module. Patch changes 0-95 are possible (16 on each string, from frets 1-16, working across from string 1-6). Not the easiest of methods (you try working out which string and which fret calls up patch 73), but to be fair it's hard to see what else could have been done without resorting to LEDs and numeric keypads.


"When it comes to transmitting patch changes, you flick the normal/chromatic switch, play a note on the guitar, and you have a new sound on your MIDI module."


A further feature which isn't specifically MIDI, but which is invaluable nonetheless, is an electronic tuner in the shape of two triangular LEDs, referenced to an internal clock frequency. Play a string and if both LEDs light up, the tuning of that string is correct; if one or the other lights up then you're sharp or flat. It's extremely accurate, and a real boon if there's other noise going on around you.

For the experienced MIDI user the range of options offered on the MGs might seem rather limited, yet for that vast army of guitarists for whom MIDI is still a four-letter word it might be just the right approach.

But perhaps there are one or two more basic facilities that you feel should be present. Can the MIDI channel be altered, and can the guitar transmit in mono mode (essential if you're pitch-bending on more than one string)? The answer to both these questions is yes, but here we encounter a more dubious aspect of the design. Accomplishing either of these things means peeling off another rubber strip on the rear of the guitar body. This reveals a set of nine DIP switches located on the circuit board which holds all the MIDI electronics and is where life starts to get difficult. DIP switch one is used to switch between poly and mono transmission (the current MIDI channel becomes the basic channel in mono mode, and is allotted to the top E string). It's a clumsy exercise at best, but you can do it. Selecting the MIDI channel is altogether more tricky: switches 2-5 effectively become four binary bits which have to be set to a number from 0-15. And just to make life even more confusing, you need to make the adjustment to channels 1-16. It's enough to give an experienced MIDI user a headache; newcomers to MIDI are more likely to suffer a catatonic fit.

DIP switches six and seven allow you to set a bend range of four, five, seven or twelve semitones, while switches eight and nine allow you to select an A tuning of 440,441, 442 or 443Hz.

I can foresee a temptation to leave the rubber strip off all the time, which may not be a good idea (particularly if you're in the habit of throwing beer all over your guitar). On the other hand, you'll probably not need to change the tuning or pitch-range settings too often, and depending on how you work and what equipment you're working with, you may not need to change the MIDI channel or mode too often either. If you're using the guitar as a MIDI controller in Poly mode in conjunction with a sequencer, it's probably easier to adjust the MIDI channel on the sequencer track (in other words, treat the guitar like a DX7 Mk1). Still, while Casio will no doubt plead economic necessity, I can't help feeling a 16-position knob for MIDI channel selection and a toggle switch for mono/poly mode selection would have made a useful addition to the MIDI panel on the front of the guitar without sacrificing the operational simplicity that Casio deem so important.

By now you will probably be aware that programmability has been sacrificed in the name of simplicity. This means, for instance, that when you're in mono mode there's no way of sending out individual patch changes for each string. In fact, when you select mono mode the MGs send out the same patch number (the current number) on all six MIDI channels. The implications of this depend on the MIDI slave setup you're using. With a single multi-timbral instrument it will obviously depend on whether the patch number calls up a multi-timbral memory via the basic channel or whether the same patch is called up on each channel. If you're using several different instruments, you'll have to ensure that the sounds you want to combine all use the same memory number. Yes, things can still get tricky, despite Casio's best intentions.


"The MG guitars prove that MIDI can become an integral part of a solid-body guitar without disrupting the look, feel or balance of the instrument."


Power for the MIDI electronics is provided by either six AA-size batteries (located behind a plate on the back of the instrument) or by a 9V DC power supply which plugs into the guitar between the jack output and MIDI Out connections. Battery power is essential for live work (unless you're prepared to stand still all the time), and there should be no problem about batteries lasting the course of a live set. But ironically, as guitarists start to make use of radio transmitters in order to free themselves from the ubiquitous audio lead, along comes a new cord for them to contend with: MIDI.


Price:695.00
(Including VAT at 20%)


Quantity:  

Used Vintage 1963 Harmony H75 guitar
Used Vintage 1963 Harmony H75 guitarUsed Vintage 1963 Harmony H75 guitarUsed Vintage 1963 Harmony H75 guitarUsed Vintage 1963 Harmony H75 guitar
Used Vintage 1963 Harmony H75 guitar

Used Vintage 1963 Harmony H75 guitar

Year of Manufacture -1963

Case - Hard Case

Condition - VGC

Weight - 7llbs.9oz

This is one of the most highly praised models, from one of the most highly praised eras of guitar making. Favoured by many, most notably Dan Auerbach of The Black Keys,Stevie Winwood and Kieth Richards.

This particular guitar is as original as you’ll find them and in almost mint condition. A true rarity one for the collection! The original pickups give out a sound to die for. This really will sing!

Please email or call us on 01425 478135 for details


Price:1,295.00
(Including VAT at 20%)




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Other payment options available on request please phone or email.

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Used PRS Standard 22 in Very Funky Green Metallic.
Used PRS Standard 22 in Very Funky Green Metallic.Used PRS Standard 22 in Very Funky Green Metallic.Used PRS Standard 22 in Very Funky Green Metallic.Used PRS Standard 22 in Very Funky Green Metallic.

Used PRS Standard 22 in Very Funky Green Metallic.

Year of Manufacture - 2002

Case - Hard case

Condition - VGC

Weight - 9llbs1oz

Cool guitar, made in the USA in 2002. Very resonant guitar! Mahogany body and neck, 22 frets, moon inlay, vivid green finish, two Dragon II pickups, PRS tremolo.

Please email or call us on 01425 478135 for details



Price:1,250.00
(Including VAT at 20%)




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Used Mid 70s Rickenbacker 480 in Rare Burgundy. Changed scratchplate.
Used Mid 70s Rickenbacker 480 in Rare Burgundy. Changed scratchplate.Used Mid 70s Rickenbacker 480 in Rare Burgundy. Changed scratchplate.Used Mid 70s Rickenbacker 480 in Rare Burgundy. Changed scratchplate.Used Mid 70s Rickenbacker 480 in Rare Burgundy. Changed scratchplate.
Used Mid 70s Rickenbacker 480 in Rare Burgundy. Changed scratchplate.

Used Mid 70s Rickenbacker 480 in Rare Burgundy. Changed scratchplate.

Year of Manufacture - 73-84

Serial Number - Unreadable

Case - None

Condition - In good vintage condition without original scratch plate.

Weight - 7.9 lbs

Please email or call us on 01425 478135 for details

The Rickenbacker 480 series (the 480, 481 and 483) all used a similar body style to the iconic 4000 series basses. These guitars were never as popular as more famous Rickenbackers such as the 360, but are of interest to collectors due to their relative rarity. Unlike most Rickenbackers, the 480 uses a bolt-on neck.

Years of Production: 1973 - 1984

Body Style: Solidbody, double cutaway

Wood Composition: Maple body, Maple neck with Rosewood fingerboard

Design Elements: Dual Hi-gain pickups, dot inlays, white pickguard, two volume and tone knobs, R tailpiece

Finish Specifications: Burgandy is less common than standard Rickenbacker finishes like Fireglo and Jetglo.


Price:1,995.00
(Including VAT at 20%)




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Used PRS Custom Racing Stripe 10 Top Stunning
Used PRS Custom Racing Stripe 10 Top StunningUsed PRS Custom Racing Stripe 10 Top StunningUsed PRS Custom Racing Stripe 10 Top StunningUsed PRS Custom Racing Stripe 10 Top Stunning

Used PRS Custom Racing Stripe 10 Top Stunning

Year of Manufacture - 2014

Serial Number - 14Z07410

Case - Hard Case

Condition - Mint

Weight - 7llbs60z

Please email or call us on 01425 478135 for details


Price:3,695.00
(Including VAT at 20%)


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Used Gretsch Synchromatic 1958 with floating neck pick up. Refretted by Andrew Scrimshaw
Used Gretsch Synchromatic 1958 with floating neck pick up. Refretted by Andrew ScrimshawUsed Gretsch Synchromatic 1958 with floating neck pick up. Refretted by Andrew ScrimshawUsed Gretsch Synchromatic 1958 with floating neck pick up. Refretted by Andrew ScrimshawUsed Gretsch Synchromatic 1958 with floating neck pick up. Refretted by Andrew Scrimshaw

Used Gretsch Synchromatic 1958 with floating neck pick up. Refretted by Andrew Scrimshaw

Year of Manufacture - 1958

Serial Number - 11197

Case - Gig Bag

Condition - Really Good

Weight - 6lbs 4oz

Really sturdy vintage archtop with a great Fret job by Andrew Scrimhaw. From Jazz to Skiffle it handles it all and behaves exactly how you would hope a vintage guitar would.

Please email or call us on 01425 478135 for further details.


Price:1,295.00
(Including VAT at 20%)




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